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Dummies part of training at Bremerton hospital

Jan. 16, 2013 - 08:23AM   |   Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2013 - 08:23AM  |  
Petty Officer Second Class Blake Hite takes part in a cardiac arrest simulation Jan. 14 at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Wash. The hospital's 2 1/2-year-old simulation lab just got three of the most advanced mannequins available, increasing its population to eight. The new mannequins breathe, bleed, talk and mimic other human functions.
Petty Officer Second Class Blake Hite takes part in a cardiac arrest simulation Jan. 14 at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Wash. The hospital's 2 1/2-year-old simulation lab just got three of the most advanced mannequins available, increasing its population to eight. The new mannequins breathe, bleed, talk and mimic other human functions. (Meegan M. Reid / Kitsap Sun via AP)
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Lt. Patty Butler works Jan. 14 with the patient simulator named "Anne" as she goes over an OB/GYN scenario during a nurse orientation at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Wash. The hospital's 2 1/2-year-old simulation lab just got three of the most advanced mannequins available, increasing its population to eight. The new mannequins breathe, bleed, talk and mimic other human functions. (Meegan M. Reid / Kitsap Sun via AP)

BREMERTON, Wash. — Naval Hospital Bremerton doctors, nurses and corpsmen stay sharp by working on dummies.

The hospital's 2 1/2-year-old simulation lab just got three of the most advanced mannequins available, increasing its population to eight. The new mannequins breathe, bleed, talk and mimic other human functions.

"Go away. I'm so sick," moaned one of them, dubbed Sim Man, as guests entered his seventh-floor hospital room (the simulation main lab) Monday. He seemed OK. He was breathing, and his vital signs looked fine on the monitor.

A half-hour later, though, nurses Lt. Cmdr. Johannes Bailey and Lt. j.g. Shannon Posey and Corpsman 2nd Class Blake Hite rushed to his side. Sim Man was having a heart attack. He had no pulse. Bailey and Posey alternated between chest compressions and giving breaths while Hite readied a defibrillator. A shock brought Sim Man back to life.

He didn't even say thanks.

Simulators are especially effective at getting teams ready to respond to stressful situations such as a heart attack.

"You can't take a test on talking to a real person," said Hite, the simulation program manager. "That's where we've seen real improvement. Everybody's on the same page and knows what to do."

Lying on a gurney beside Sim Man is Sim Junior, the hospital's first kid mannequin. He and two others — an adult called 3G and a baby known as NewB — are right off the production line and still being installed.

The simulation center gives health care providers a chance to care for patients without the actual human patients, and develop and maintain a variety of skills. They can practice inserting trachea and stomach tubes, stitch up wounds, birth a baby, listen to lungs and hearts, give shots, draw blood (red water) and insert catheters (Gatorade).

"It's slowly made its way to become more and more realistic," Hite said. "It used to be a piece of plastic that you can't do anything. You can speak through them (now) and give all the pulses."

Mannequins are operated with a computer program. Trainers decide what scenario they want to present and Doug Jones, the simulation operator, plugs it in so the mannequins respond appropriately.

"We have the ability if (the trainees) do this, this will happen. If you fail to do this, this will happen," Jones said.

In another top-floor room Monday, a group huddled around the birthing mom mannequin and learned about postpartum hemorrhaging and what steps to take to make sure the mother is safe and stop the bleeding.

Two floors down, on the medical/surgical ward, is another simulated woman. Noelle has a hose through her nose to her stomach, sucking out fluid.

Family medicine residents often use the simulation lab to maintain credentials to perform patient care and keep their skills sharp. Hospital staff go there to help get certified before going to the field or fleet.

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