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 Education

  1. Adm. William H. McRaven is seen delivering the commencement address in May at The University of Texas at Austin. The Associated Press

    SOCOM chief McRaven set to become next chancellor for University of Texas System

    University of Texas System regents on Tuesday selected one of the top U.S. military special operations leaders as the lone finalist for the job of chancellor, overseeing the system's 15 campuses and $14 billion budget.

    • Jul. 29, 2014
  2. Spc. Bradley Darnell, an Army food service specialist, shaved a semester off his associate degree from Central Texas College with credit for his military training. Lance Rosenfield

    Most popular colleges: What to know before you go

    Schools known for their flexible learning options are by far the most popular among both active-duty service members using tuition assistance and veterans and their dependents using the Post-9/11 GI Bill, government data show.

    • Jul. 28, 2014
  3. Grant helps launch nursing program for veterans

    A $1 million federal grant to the University of Michigan-Flint will assist military veterans in earning an accelerated degree in nursing.

    • Jul. 28, 2014
  4. Online university to give discount to community college grads

    Missouri's community colleges have a new tuition agreement with an online university.

    • Jul. 28, 2014
  5. Va. to join higher ed distance learning agreement

    Virginia higher education officials are working to make it easier for students to take online classes and for universities to offer them.

    • Jul. 28, 2014
  6. DoD tightens tuition assistance rules

    Force-wide changes to the military's Tuition Assistance program may require troops to pay back their TA money if they perform poorly in class.

    • Jul. 25, 2014
  7. Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill. T.J. Kirkpatrick / Getty Images

    College's recruiting practices draw congressional fire

    Senators and student veteran leaders are working to dissuade would-be college students from using GI Bill funds to enroll at WyoTech and Heald, criticizing the schools' recent recruiting actions as irresponsible and predatory.

    • Jul. 23, 2014
  8. Rear Adm. Mike White, who took over Naval Education and Training Command in January, speaks with sailors aboard the cruiser Princeton in April 2013 as part of his old job as commander of Carrier Strike Group 11. MC2 Jason Behnke/Navy

    Training boss talks classroom changes

    Whether training recruits, operating schoolhouses or overseeing the force's general military training, Naval Education and Training Command runs sailor education and development from cradle to grave.

    • Jul. 19, 2014
  9. Colleges are for sale but they continue to recruit on bases

    Their college campuses are for sale and they're under attack from federal regulators, but that hasn't stopped a pair of for-profit schools from recruiting new students at military bases.

    • Jul. 18, 2014
  10. U.S. to review University of Phoenix records

    Apollo Education Group said the U.S. Education Department will review the administration of federal student financial aid programs by its University of Phoenix subsidiary.

    • Jul. 15, 2014
  11. Pilot Jake Stoltz, left, and Trevor Woods of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences at the University of North Dakota remotely pilot a Draganflyer X4ES drone during a conference last month. They were demonstrating possible law enforcement applications. The unmanned aerial systems field is expected to be a $90 billion industry by 2025, according to some experts. Bruce Crummy/ / The Associated Press

    Ohio colleges team up on drone programs

    Ohio State University said it will partner with a southwest Ohio community college to position students at both institutions for careers in drone technology.

    • Jul. 14, 2014
  12. VA faulted for delays in G.I. Bill student benefits

    Nearly 80,000 veterans eligible for the new G.I.

    • Jul. 14, 2014
  13. An Everest Institute location in an office building in Silver Spring, Md., is one of a dozen campuses that for-profit education company Corinthian Colleges Inc. is closing. Jose Luis Magana/ / The Associated Press

    Corinthian tells students they'll be able to finish degrees

    A for-profit education company is trying to reassure nervous students that they'll be able to finish their degrees even though their campuses are being closed amid concerns from the Education Department about its practices.

    • Jul. 11, 2014
  14. Indiana University aims to help students graduate on time

    Indiana University has started a new office aimed at helping more students graduate on time at all the school's campuses across the state.

    • Jul. 11, 2014
  15. Georgia college offers online business degree

    The University of Georgia's business school has launched an online business degree program.

    • Jul. 8, 2014
  16. The modern comforts and technological advances of online education are allowing more people to get degrees when life prevents or discourages a trip back to a brick-and-mortar school. Damian Dovarganes/The Associated Press

    Online degree program's flexibility pays off for officer

    When Maj. Chris Costello of the Pennsylvania National Guard received his fourth overseas deployment in a decade, this time to Kuwait in 2012, he decided to go back to school in the Arabian Desert.

    • Jul. 1, 2014
  17. STEM skills more important to employers than bachelor's degree, study indicates

    High school graduates with a background in science, technology, engineering and math are in higher demand in the job market than college grads without such skill, according to a new Brookings Institution study.

    • Jul. 1, 2014
  18. The popular ACT college admissions exam is broadening how it reports student's scores. The ACT said that on June 14, just under 600,000 students were scheduled to take the exam  a record high. Seth Perlman/The Associated Press

    ACT to 'polish' how scores reported for admissions exam

    The popular ACT college admissions exam is broadening how it reports students' scores.

    • Jul. 1, 2014
  19. Henry Ford College in Dearborn, Michigan, dropped the word 'Community' from its name this year, in part, officials said, to reflect that it has some four-year degree programs. Dwight Burdette/Wikipedia

    Community colleges shorten their names

    Small but growing numbers of community colleges are moving to drop the word 'community' from their name, inspiring a sometimes passionate parsing of its meaning.

    • Jun. 30, 2014
  20. UCLA officials propose diversity class requirement

    University of California, Los Angeles officials are proposing that most undergraduate students be required to take a class in racial cultural, gender or religious diversity in order to graduate.

    • Jun. 30, 2014
  21. Project will try to evaluate what college students learn

    Nine states will participate in a project to determine how well college students are reaching certain educational goals, according to an announcement by the two groups leading the program.

    • Jun. 30, 2014
  22. A person with a bachelor's degree can expect to earn about $1.2 million more, from ages 22 to 64, than someone with just a high school diploma, according to a report released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    College degree still has more earning power, study says

    Some comforting news for recent college graduates facing a tough job market and years of student loan payments: That college degree is still worth it.

    • Jun. 24, 2014
  23. Corinthian Colleges, U.S. in tentative agreement

    Corinthian Colleges Inc. and the U.S. Education Department have reached an agreement that will allow the for-profit education company to receive an immediate $16 million in federal student aid funds and keep operating.

    • Jun. 24, 2014
  24. Acting Veterans Affairs Secretary Sloan Gibson said lawmakers are not likely to reduce or eliminate veterans education benefits. Getty Images

    GI Bill benefit unlikely to be cut, acting VA secretary says

    Acting Veterans Affairs Secretary Sloan Gibson said he 'can't imagine' lawmakers cutting back on veterans education benefits in the near future even with the continued fiscal pressures facing Congress.

    • Jun. 23, 2014
  25. President Obama writes that, as was the case with the veterans who used the first GI Bill 70 years ago, investing in our newest veterans will produce leaders the country needs. Rob Curtis/Staff

    Obama: Post-9/11 GI Bill keeps promise to newest vets

    The GI Bill, celebrating its 70th anniversary, has had a huge positive impact on the lives of millions of veterans over the years. President Obama says the generous Post-9/11 GI Bill continues to transform lives as one of the 'smartest investments' the nation has ever made.

    • Jun. 20, 2014
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