There are lots of new threads headed your way.

Lightweight NWU. Data from a 60-day wear test of the lighter "blueberries" is being analyzed, with an announcement expected in early 2015. The prototypes weigh about one-third less and were described by sailors as "more breathable" and "much cooler." This uniform is designed for sailors assigned to hotter climates.

First class midshipmen Nikki Funkhauser and J.D. Kameen model the new track suit that will be fielded to the Navy at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Virginia, on Thursday, September 11, 2014. (Mike Morones/Staff)
First class midshipmen Nikki Funkhauser and J.D. Kameen model the new track suit that will be fielded to the Navy at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Virginia, on Thursday, September 11, 2014. (Mike Morones/Staff)

Navy officials are considering whether to fast-track warm-up suits, like those worn at the Naval Academy, modeled by Midshipman 1st Class J.D. Kameen.

Photo Credit: Mike Morones/Navy Times

Warm-up suit. The Navy is expected to make a decision in 2015 on adopting a high-performance warm-up suit for physical training. Made of moisture-wicking material, the warm-up suit is based on running gear worn by Marines, as well as Naval Academy midshipmen. The color scheme is likely to be blue with silver or gold Navy lettering.

Cold-weather parka. The Navy is leaning toward adopting a black version of the Coast Guard's three-in-one parka for climates where the peacoat won't cut it. The waterproof outer shell has a center rank tab, similar to the NWU parka. The shell has two zip-in liners: a fleece liner and a lighter, water-repellent jacket, which can be worn as a stand-alone garment and sports its own rank tab. The parka would be worn with service uniforms.

Product shots of test versions of proposed parka for Navy personnel at Gannett Government Media in Springfield, VA on Tuesday, December 4, 2012. (Mike Morones/Navy Times)
Product shots of test versions of proposed parka for Navy personnel at Gannett Government Media in Springfield, VA on Tuesday, December 4, 2012. (Mike Morones/Navy Times)

In 2015, officials are leaning towards adopting a three-in-one parka for cold weather that's now worn by the U.S. Coast Guard. The Navy's version would be black instead of dark blue.

Photo Credit: Mike Morones/Navy Times

Female uniform changes. Feedback from ongoing wear tests of the female service dress blue jumper with "Dixie cups" will be incorporated into final designs in 2015, as part of Navy leadership's push to outfit women in the same uniform styles as male peers.

But the revamped SDBs — complete with side zipper on the blouse and a front zipper on the trousers that makes the 13-buttons purely decorative — won't be in uniform stores until 2016, officials say.

Female chiefs and officers have been testing a new combination cover modeled more closely off the male cover. The design is expected to be finalized in 2015. If it's approved, the cover could start replacing the so-called "bucket hats" now worn, starting in 2016.

Some female chiefs and officers will also get to test wear new summer dress whites, but that won't begin until early 2016. The new uniform will feature a high collar like the male version. There will be no pockets on the chest and it will have smaller buttons.

Lance M. Bacon/Staff About 30 female sailors are testing uniform items before a larger wear test in the fall. Participants include Electronics Technician 2nd Class Melissa Rheaume, left, and Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Alyzamarie Santos.
Lance M. Bacon/Staff About 30 female sailors are testing uniform items before a larger wear test in the fall. Participants include Electronics Technician 2nd Class Melissa Rheaume, left, and Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Alyzamarie Santos.

Officials have collected feedback from female sailors on wear tests of "Dixie Cup" covers and jumper-style service dress blues. Their feedback will be incorporated into final decisions on the uniform in 2015, officials say.

Photo Credit: Lance M. Bacon/Staff