Your "blueberries" are done. Readers reacted to news the service is dumping the blue-and-gray camouflage Navy working uniform for the woodland version with emotions ranging from excitement and optimism to derision and dismay.

"Green is the new Blue," one Twitter user joked.

Some heralded the shift to the green-and-tan NWU cammies, a tactical uniform that officials say is more comfortable and better designed. But sailors who wear it in expeditionary force sailors lamented that they'd lose their distinct identity as the roughly 280,000 other sailors in the force adopt what had once been their uniform.

Others came forward to recommend new uniform ideas. Flame-resistant coveralls should be sold in uniform stores. The PT shorts aren't suited for running. And the service should adopt the Coast Guard's fleet uniform as soon as possible.

Meanwhile, the retired crowd didn't wait long to start call for dungarees. Here's what readers said:

PUSHBACK ON 'DUMBEST'

I don't understand why NWU type I were the "dumbest"? They were easy to maintain, easy to prep, they actually looked like a military uniform and most of all. We were allowed to run quick errands in them. I feel like those that hate the Type I didn't experience utilities. Utilities needed to be ironed, you practically couldn't be seen out in town in them. Even getting gas would get you dirty looks. The shirts were easy to stain, which sucks if you were in a maintenance rating. Oh and shirt stays were torture, but need to keep the shirt in. Yes the camo coloring for Type I is silly, but did utilities have any hint of being in the armed forces??

Jose Sanchez

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SO LONG, AQUAFLAGE

Great another uniform change just in time for another uniform change (the shore and sea coveralls)... if someone is really listening to our feedback, why are we so blatantly shot down about beards?

Ryan Vegas Purser

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I feel you. 3 years I spent with Marines as an HM wearing their uniform and it irked me putting on my blueberries again

Melissa Zwiefel

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Let those attached to NECC keep their Type 3's and those that aren't apart of NECC or Brown Water Navy wear their coveralls, or utilities, or dungs or whatever is best fit for ship and plane. Leave the woodlands and deserts to those in NECC. We look different for a reason. Now I'm gonna get confused for a fleeter, instead of a bee cuz they are not gonna look for the Seabee patch on right pocket.

Mike Galvin Jr.

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There is already a solid blue two-piece flame retardant uniform being worn by the Coast Guard. The Navy could save millions by just purchasing the same. The only difference would be the name tapes and rank insignia's

Charles Mann

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Khakis have khakis and E6 and below have NSU's that can be worn on shore, so why do we need this uniform at all? I get it that certain ratings need this type of uniform to work in on shore but those that do are pretty much already wearing the Type 3. Those that aren't wearing the Type 3 now could easily not wear NWUs at all.

Ryan Sn

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So, I completely understand the removal of the NWUs, and all the reasons why. But moving it to Type III is absolutely ridiculous. So, shore Sailors, can go to Type III. I guess for non-dirty jobs, khakis and the black and tans won't work. And coveralls for dirty work will not work either. Really....... Look, stop asking what everyone would like to wear! Make a decision, base it on personnel working environments, and safety. A survey, back in 98, 99 time frame. Sailors wanted a "cool" uniform. And look where it got us. This is exactly how we got here. Best uniform at sea.....coveralls. Shore, depends on the job, rate, etc. Outside of a handful of specific rates, certain duty stations and special circumstances, cammies, come on man, really!

Gus P. Zografos

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NEXT MOVES

Personally, I'd like to see a change in the PTU... Worst thing to run in... The damn shorts ride. God forbid on self PT day you go for a long run.

Brandy Lambert

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I would still like to see the option to purchase the FRV coveralls at the Exchange. The current system is broken because I have to rely on my supply department to issue them and the Navy is freakin broke. So meanwhile, I get to stink because it's the only authorized uniform underway and I can't get any. PLEASE, for the love of God, allow me to take control of my own hygiene on this. Ugh.

Jeremy Hulme

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If you want a two piece utility uniform just steal the Coast guards ODU uniform. I don't care if they'll make fun of us, they're the Coast Guard and it's exactly what we've been asking for since I got in back in 2005.

Daniel Rocha

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The NWU's should have had a lighter weight ripstop material introduced over 8 years ago for hotter climates! Maybe that would have helped with acceptance by the Fleets. It has been an utter failure on the part of leadership that it was never done so. Also Task Force Uniform, failed in its mandate to consolidate the seabag, which never happened and isn't addressed to this date. Finally, this color neither serves the purpose of camouflage in a naval environment, nor promotes the image of Sailors, so it is another change for the sake of change,

Jeffrey Taylor

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COMMON CAMO

And to think, the reason all branches went to the BDUs in 1970s was to have an effective camouflage and uniform dress across all branches that provided a cost savings due to the uniformity of patterns, suppliers and equipment, Then they had to have their own again which costs more than just uniforms, it is equipment etc. GO BACK TO A SINGLE UNIFORM ACROSS ALL BRANCHES.

Chris Batts

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So can anyone tell this civilian why all the services don't just wear the same uniform? Are the requirements for Sailors really so different from those for Airmen or Soldiers?

Charlie Lawton

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As an old Army Infantryman, I have never understand the push for camouflage uniforms for any service member who isn't going to be in land combat or land combat support. Uniforms should be appropriate for the job, and if you're on a ship in the middle of the ocean, you don't need to be dressed like a tree; not even a blue one.

Douglas E. Berry

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THE DUNGAREES DEBATE

Sea duty uniforms should go back to the Seafarer dungarees. It was the most comfortable and it helped distinguish the sailors who took initiative to iron them and the lazy who pulled theirs from the bottom of the sea bag.

Stephen Clugston

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The pockets on the old dungarees and even the newer version of utilities weren't practical. They soiled and got ruined a lot faster and took way more time to maintain than NWUs. It's a stupid waste of time when it takes longer to iron and prepare a "working uniform" like dungarees that's made to work/get dirty in than an outfit you'd go to church in or out on a Friday night.

Brian Derby

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Enlisted in 2003, and was issued Utilities. They were great. Took a little care to make look good, but it was something to take pride in. Then the switch to NWU's. Said they wouldn't melt in a fire (yet are made of the same material as utilities). Aquaflage was never a good idea, but hey.. Blue shirts don't get to make these decisions. We are Sailors, because we want to be. We have so far spent well over a BILLION dollars on design, wear testing, redesign, more wear testing, and fleet rollout on the current uniform. Polyester in any amount melts. There it is.. That's the fact. Dungarees were the ideal uniform. They were cotton, easy to maintain, cheap to make and almost as important, cheap to replace. Who wants to spend $300 on a parka, and around $150 per set of NWUs (more depending on patches)?

Allen Horton

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