The largest and most expensive destroyer built for the U.S. Navy has resumed its voyage after a breakdown in the Panama Canal.

The Navy said Thursday that the USS Zumwalt departed Panama after repairs to the propulsion system by the ship's crew and a team from General Electric and the Naval Sea Systems Command.

Lt. Julie Holland says the ship resumed its journey to its homeport Wednesday evening and will arrive in San Diego "in coming weeks."

The 610-foot destroyer built by Maine's Bath Iron Works was in the Panama Canal when it lost propulsion on Nov. 21. The U.S. Naval Institute says the engineering failure locked both propeller shafts, forcing it to transit the canal with the help of tugs.

161130-N-HV059-005 BALBOA, Panama (Nov. 30, 2016) USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is shown pier-side near the Bridge of the Americas. Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation destroyers designed to strengthen naval power by performing critical missions and enhancing U.S. deterrence, power projection and sea control objectives. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Sonja Wickard/Released)
161130-N-HV059-005 BALBOA, Panama (Nov. 30, 2016) USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is shown pier-side near the Bridge of the Americas. Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation destroyers designed to strengthen naval power by performing critical missions and enhancing U.S. deterrence, power projection and sea control objectives. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Sonja Wickard/Released)

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is shown pier-side near the Bridge of the Americas on Nov. 30, 2016, in Balboa, Panama. Crewed by 147 sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation destroyers designed to strengthen naval power by performing critical missions and enhancing U.S. deterrence, power projection and sea control objectives.

Photo Credit: PO2 Sonja Wickard/Navy